The path

From Organic Design
(Redirected from Path)
Jump to: navigation, search
Glossary.svg This page describes a concept which is part of our glossary
At OrganicDesign we refer to someone as "being on the path" if they are, through their actions, showing that they are dedicated to true objectiveness and self improvement. It's not only about what someone says their direction is or what their current state of understanding may be, but rather that their actions over time show consistent application of time and energy into ever increasing awareness.

The Four Duties of the Master

The path of the Masters has a very good set of four duties which map perfectly to the dichotomous system of the Taoists. The duties of the Masters are many, but when summarised they consist of these four foundational items which fit into quadrants formed from the dichotomies of one:many (individual:whole) and notion:instance (knowledge/work).

Connect souls with the audible life stream: The entire Universe is a single harmonic structure that we must all tune in to, and ultimately it must be the foundation of knowledge in our mass-consciousness and on which our global society is based.

Teach the Way: There is a way in which we can live out lives to be in accord with this ultimate harmony and has been given many names throughout the ages such as "The Way", "Tao" and "Dharma".

The Master is a perfect exemplar: In his actions, the Master acts as a perfect example of being in accord with the Way.

Bring light and love into the world: When the Master isn't teaching the people, he works on "the project", using his knowledge, resources and position to deploy the principles into the mechanism of society.

Tao Te Ching Intro

Quote.pngThere is a way in which we may conduct our lives without regrets, and in such a manner as assists in developing and realising our individual potential, without harming others, or inhibiting the realisation of their potential, and which is beneficial to a healthy society.

Such a way of life may of course be conducted without a name, and without description, but in order that others may know of it, and so as to distinguish it from other ways in which life may be conducted, we give it a name, and use words to describe it.

When discussing or describing this way in which life may be conducted, rather than refer to it in full, for convenience, we refer to it as the way, meaning simply that the discussion is concerned with this particular way, not that it is the only way of conducting one's life.

In order that we might distinguish it more easily from other ways, we refer to it also by its original name, which is Tao.
— Stan Rosenthal, Introduction to Tao Te Ching translation


See also